Jackson Williams:

I watched the entire debate and by the forty-fifth minute blood was shooting out my ears like twin geysers. It was one hell of a fucking mess, let me tell you…I’ll be posting my own “in-depth analysis” of the Obama vs. Romney debate on Sunday. I will also be doing the same for the Vice Presidential debate between Paul Ryan vs. Joe Biden next weekend. Cheers.

         — Jackson Williams

Originally posted on Gigaom:

According to Twitter, the presidential debate in Colorado on Wednesday night generated a maelstrom of more than 10 million messages in less than two hours, making it the most tweeted-about event in U.S. political history, and one of the most tweeted-about events ever — close to the record set during the Super Bowl. Obviously Twitter is probably happy about that, and you could argue that those kinds of numbers show that large numbers of people were at least paying attention to the debate, for better or worse. But is the kind of instantaneous commentary and snap judgement that the social network specializes in a good fit with the political process, or does it just turn it into a sideshow?

In the past, any truly public analysis of the performance of the candidates had to wait until the event was over, when the usual political operatives and pundits like former…

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